Christmas Pudding With Russian Imperial Stout Soaked Dried Fruit & Hard SauceChristmas Pudding is a traditional medieval English dessert served on December 25th.  Sometimes called “figgy pudding” or “plum pudding,” this dessert is more like a steamed cake filled with dried fruit and alcohol than a traditional custard-style pudding.  It is different from the fruitcake, as it is not quite as heavy and dense.  This Christmas Pudding with Russian Imperial Stout Soaked Dried Fruit & Hard Sauce recipe is best if made a few weeks in advance of being served.  It will hold well and can take some of the pressure of creating a whole Holiday Feast the day off.

This pudding can be customized to anyone’s liking.  This recipe highlights the flavors of the fruit to go with a Russian Imperial Stout.

Makes: 9 individual 6-ounce puddings or one large 4-1/2-pound pudding

 

Adapted from BeerAdvocate Magazine: Cuisine à la Bière | Dec 2013 | Issue #83

Check out my other Holiday Feast ideas, menu suggestions, and recipes.

Christmas Pudding With Russian Imperial Stout Soaked Dried Fruit & Hard Sauce
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A traditional English dessert, this Christmas Pudding (also called Figgy Pudding or Plum Pudding), uses a Russian Imperial Stout to soak the dried fruit and then steamed.
Servings Prep Time
9 guests 20 minute
Cook Time Passive Time
7 hour 24 hour
Servings Prep Time
9 guests 20 minute
Cook Time Passive Time
7 hour 24 hour
Christmas Pudding With Russian Imperial Stout Soaked Dried Fruit & Hard Sauce
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
A traditional English dessert, this Christmas Pudding (also called Figgy Pudding or Plum Pudding), uses a Russian Imperial Stout to soak the dried fruit and then steamed.
Servings Prep Time
9 guests 20 minute
Cook Time Passive Time
7 hour 24 hour
Servings Prep Time
9 guests 20 minute
Cook Time Passive Time
7 hour 24 hour
Ingredients
Russian Imperial Stout Soaked Dried Fruit Ingredients:
Christmas Pudding Ingredients:
Special Equipment:
Christmas Pudding Garnish Options:
  • 4 ounce brown spirits, Traditionally Brandy or Cognac, yet for this version, I like Bourbon, Irish Whiskey or Scotch (for flambé)
  • 1 recipe Hard Sauce, recipe here
Servings: guests
Units:
Instructions
Russian Imperial Stout Soaked Dried Fruit Directions:
  • Start by measuring out the figs, currants, golden raisins and cherries into a medium-size bowl. Top the fruit with the Imperial Stout and zest of an orange (leaving behind any pith or white rind from under the orange skin) and mix together well.
  • Wrap with plastic wrap and let sit for at least 24 hours or as long as a week (in the refrigerator). This will rehydrate the fruit and infuse the flavors together. The roasty, coffee and chocolaty notes from the Russian Imperial Stout while the bright orange essence, enhance each other in the classic flavor combination.
Christmas Pudding Directions:
  • In a medium-size bowl, add the eggs and whisk until they become frothy. Add in the dark brown sugar and treacle, then whisk to combine. Slowly pour in the warm butter, followed by the Russian Imperial Stout, grated carrot and orange juice; mix well.
  • In another bowl, add the breadcrumbs, all-purpose and barley flours, any nuts, cinnamon, allspice, clove, nutmeg and baking powder. Using a clean whisk, stir to evenly incorporate all the dry ingredients together.
  • Add the soaked dried fruit and all the syrupy juices to the wet mixture, and fold in the dry ingredients, blending together. Once the batter is made, it can either be divided into nine individual serving containers or one large pudding mold. For the individual serving vessels, I suggest an 8-ounce wide mouth canning jar with a screw-top lid. These allow for the finished pudding to be easily removed, plus they’re heat tolerant, can be sealed and can also be given away as gifts or a host | hostess present. A large glass bowl or pudding mold can be used for a single pudding. With either presentation, grease the container with a liberal amount of butter, coating evenly.
  • For Individual Servings: Portion out just over 6 ounces of pudding batter into each canning jar. Wipe the rim and threads with a paper towel to remove any debris. Seal each jar tightly with a lid and ring and place aside.
  • For One Large Mold: If using a large mold, fill with the pudding mixture and create a parchment ring to cover the batter. Then cover the mold with a single piece of aluminum foil to prevent any water or steam from entering or escaping the mold, while the parchment paper will act as a block to the rising pudding coming in direct contact with the foil.
How to Cook the Christmas Pudding Directions:
  • Traditional Steaming: Stove Top To steam the pudding(s), there are a few heat and equipment choices. Traditionally, the pudding is put into a metal or bamboo steamer, and placed over a simmering pot of water. This can still be done, just check the water level every hour to prevent the water from fully evaporating during the cooking process. For a larger single pudding, plan on steaming the pudding for 7 – 8 hours. Since the steam is a wet heat and the batter is damp, the pudding will not dry out with this amount of time. If steaming several 8-ounce jars, the cooking time can take about four hours, as there is more surface area than a larger mold.
  • Traditional Steaming: Oven Another alternative is to set the pudding mold(s) into a large tray or hotel pan with high sides, filling with boiling hot water halfway up the sides of the mold(s). Cover the pan first with a tight seal of plastic wrap, then a sheet of aluminum foil to create a seal, keeping the steam in the pan while baking in the dry oven. Then place the prepared tray into a preheated 300°F | 149°C oven to steam. The pudding will need very little attention while steaming. For a larger single pudding, plan on steaming the pudding for 7 – 8 hours. Since the steam is a wet heat and the batter is damp, the pudding will not dry out with this amount of time. If steaming several 8-ounce jars, the cooking time can take about four hours, as there is more surface area than a larger mold.
  • Traditional Steaming: Sous Vide The modern cooking method of steaming a Christmas Pudding would be using sous vide. As the individual cakes are sealed in wide mouth jars, with a canning lid already, place them into a water bath set to 200°F | 93°C and hold for 4 hours. Remove from the water bath and let cool, sealing in the process.
To Serve Christmas Pudding Directions:
  • Once the pudding is cooked, it can be left for 2 – 3 weeks before serving, so this really is a dish best made ahead of time. S ome pudding enthusiasts will serve the prior year’s pudding as a special treat. Of course, the pudding can also be served the same day. To serve, rewarm the pudding in a similar steamer setup and cook for 45 – 60 minutes. Then remove from the pan/steamer with a kitchen towel, open and run a knife around the edge of the mold. Top with an upside-down plate, and invert the pudding onto the plate, giving a light shake to release the pudding from the mold. Lightly dust the top of the Christmas Pudding with powdered sugar and serve with the Hard Sauce.
  • To add to the culinary theater of the evening, the pudding can also be served flambé style. To do this, warm a 4 ounces of brown spirit (brandy or cognac is traditional during the Holiday time period, while Rum is more 'everyday'. I like a nice bourbon, Irish whisky or scotch) in a saucepan to around 160°F | 71°C. Make sure there isn’t anything flammable nearby, take the pan off heat and ignite the alcohol with a match or lighter, keeping the pan a reasonable distance away from you. Carefully pour the flaming liquor over each unmolded pudding and serve immediately.
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