Turkey Stock

homemade-canned-turkey-stock-300-sean-z-paxtonWhen the aftermath of a big feast is leaving you with turkey bones, don’t, I repeat, DON’T throw them away!  Turkey stock is like an extra gift from the turkey!  It makes sense to make, using the whole animal, not wasting anything.  Save all the bones from the turkey carcass; the leg bones (or turkey legs if no one ate them), wings, necks and the ribs | back, are all that are needed for this recipe.  If you smoked the turkey, it will add a wonderful layer of flavor into this stock.  If you didn’t smoke the turkey, but would like a smokey element, add a smoked turkey leg from the butcher!

This recipe can be made two different ways.  My new favorite way to make stock is to use a pressure cooker!  What? Stock in a pressure cooker?  YES!  It uses science!  By having a sealed container, the extra pressure increases the temperature of boiling (212°F | 100°C) to 250°F | 121°C.  This speeds up the cooking time, while getting everything out of the bones, and the added vegetables for increases flavor and makes a proper stock!  This is a great base recipe.

The resulting broth can be used for many different recipes, from soups, gravies, to sauces, casseroles and even using Thanksgiving leftover, transforming them into a entirely different entrée.

I have a Fagor Duo 10-Quart Pressure Cooker and been very happy with its design, functionality and how easy it is to use.

Turkey Stock
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Learn how to transform your leftover turkey bones into an incredible stock, perfect for risotto, pho, ramen, soup and sauces.
Servings Prep Time
10 cups 10 minute
Cook Time Passive Time
1 hour 20 minute
Servings Prep Time
10 cups 10 minute
Cook Time Passive Time
1 hour 20 minute
Turkey Stock
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Learn how to transform your leftover turkey bones into an incredible stock, perfect for risotto, pho, ramen, soup and sauces.
Servings Prep Time
10 cups 10 minute
Cook Time Passive Time
1 hour 20 minute
Servings Prep Time
10 cups 10 minute
Cook Time Passive Time
1 hour 20 minute
Ingredients
Servings: cups
Units:
Instructions
Pressure Cooked Turkey Stock Directions:
  • In a large Pressure Cooker, placed over medium heat, add the oil and saute the onions, carrots and celery for 10 minutes, on until the vegetables are starting to brown around the edges. Add the garlic, bay leaves, kombu (if using) and mushrooms. Cook another 5 minutes.
  • While the vegetables are browning, developing more flavor, brake down the turkey carcass into small pieces of bone. Using a cleaver, kitchen shears, this will increase the surface area of the bones, making the finish stock better in flavor while getting all the marrow out of the bones. This is what give that finished cooled stock that jello like texture.
  • Add the peppercorns, parsley, turkey bones and feet if using. Add enough water to come up to the fill level mark on your pressure cooker. Lock the lid into place (following the instructions on your type of unit) and set the pressure cooker to high. Adjust the heat if needed, to create a wisp of a whistle. Cook the stock for 45 minutes, making sure it has a steady steam release. After the timer goes off, turn the heat off and let the pressure cooker cool until the safety pin drops and the unit can be safely opened.
Boiled Turkey Stock Directions:
  • If you don't have a pressure cooker, you can still follow this recipe. Just brown off the vegetables in a stock pot, add all the ingredients and add 2 gallons of cold water. Bring the stock to a boil over high heat, then adjust the heat to create a simmer. Skim the stock, removing any foam that forms on the surface. Repeat this process throughout its cooking time. The stock will take about 3 - 4 hours.
Packaging the Turkey Stock:
  • Strain the cooked stock through a fine strainer while still warm. Transfer the stock into a large container if using right away (or within 5 days) or divide it into pints/quarts and re-pressure cook to have a canned, shelf stable stock for your pantry. I will also measure out stock into pints (2 cups) and pour into vacuum bags, cool (in the refrigerator until cold) and seal on high, removing all the air. Label date each bag, then place these bags into the freezer. All these options are perfect ways to have amazing stock on hand, when needed for any recipe that calls for it.
Sean Z. Paxton

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