New Mayonnaise | Aioli

Mayonnaise is one of those basic building blocks in the kitchen. Oil and fat, (fat in this case in the form of an egg yolk) carefully blended together with the science of emulsification, to create a creamy smooth condiment. It can be used to make dressings, egg, tuna, or sardine salads, to a dip or spread. This recipe, for what I can a New Mayonnaise is using the same principles of a standard mayonnaise | aioli, yet fortified with more Nutritional Density.  Let me explain.

Within a low carb, high-fat diet, we need to look outside the basics to elevate the fat in a recipe. By removing most carbohydrates from the diet, we are also losing some nutrients, both in vitamins, minerals, and other elements that our bodies need. This new mayonnaise does just that, it adds ingredients that will supplement your diet with extra nutrition and elements that we all need.

Starting with the eggs, why not use a richer, healthier egg? Outside of how the chickens are raised, it is helpful to look beyond cage-free and organic eggs. The diet of the chickens makes the eggs (and chickens) healthier. By adding flax seeds to a chicken’s diet, the results or byproducts in this case eggs that have higher levels of Omega 3’s. The importance of Omega 3 fatty acids in our diets are numerous. Here are a few articles that I found helpful at looking at this nutrient science and what our bodies need. To fully capitalize on the Omega 3’s, I also add to this recipe flax seeds that have been ground fine, right before being added to this condiment, to bring all the nutrients, fiber, and Omega 3’s in one big punch. The added benefit of adding this flax seed powder is the gelling effect that flax seeds have. With this recipe, it helps stabilize the emulsification of the egg yolks and oil, crafting a more nutrient-dense condiment while being more stable and not breaking the emulsion.

Looking at ways to increase the nutritional density of this condiment, adding white miso increases the probiotic element, with the added nutrients along with increasing the umami or fifth flavor of this new mayonnaise. Then using a fortified Nutritional Yeast, which has been shown to be high in the vitamin B’s like thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12. Nutritional Yeast also adds protein along with other trace minerals, such as zinc, selenium, manganese, and molybdenum. Along with the Omega 3’s from the eggs and flax seed powder, this new mayonnaise is getting better and better.

To improve this new mayonnaise further, I wanted to add additional collagen. Using a multi-protein derived source of collagen brings this essential element to this condiment. Collagen is found throughout the body, in our skin, hair, bone, and tendons. It is important to get collagen into our diets because as we age, we produce less and less of it. Using a Collagen Peptide, such as Ancient Nutrition Multi Collagen Protein Powder, has hydrolyzed collagen types I, II, III, V, and X from quality sources and provides a wide variety of health benefits. Using a multi-sourced collagen powder has been shown to promoting healthy skin, nails, joints, tendons while supporting the gut, heart health, and more.

Yet another reason to make your own mayonnaise | aioli at home is do to the quality of ingredients. Sadly, much of what is for sale is profit-driven. The byproduct of this is lesser quality ingredients, that promote health issues. As mayonnaise is mostly oil, the quality of the oil is always under suspicion. Oils such as canola, grapeseed, peanut, safflower all are super high in Omega 6 fatty acids. These oils are not good for our bodies as they promote inflammation, as the ratio of Omega 3’s to Omega 6’s is out of proportion. Canola oil has 26 times more Omega 6’s than Omega 3’s, making it a very unhealthy oil to use in the kitchen. Using olive oil, avocado oil and coconut oil, are much healthier options. Most commercial mayonnaises, sadly do not use these higher quality oils. This is why making your own mayonnaise is better for you and your diet. Sure, the convenience isn’t as easy, yet, you didn’t need to go to the store to get the mayonnaise.

Technically using garlic, even roasted garlic into a mayonnaise makes the resulting emulsified condiment into an aioli. I like the added flavor, as garlic is rich in umami and full of beneficial nutrients that our bodies need. The Sulfur-Containing Compounds in Garlic have been proven to help prevent cancer, improve cardiovascular health, detox supporting and antiviral | antifungal | antibacterial. I suggest using some raw and the rest roasted garlic. Use as much or as little as you prefer, or for the intended use of this new mayonnaise.

This recipe for new mayonnaise is a stepping stone recipe. This recipe can be modified, changed, and added too, to create other versions of mayonnaise | aioli that can bring other nutrients and health benefits to a high-fat diet. As mayonnaise is a condiment, that can be used in lots of different ways, this recipe becomes that foundational recipe for lots of different recipes | meals. This recipe with these flavorings has a pretty neutral flavor profile. Other versions of this new mayonnaise will have unique and delicious flavors, depending on the added ingredients.

Here are some other recipes for homemade mayonnaise | aioli, that can be created and have on hand to make so many other dishes. Below are some ideas on how to use this mayonnaise recipe, with added health benefits.

More Mayonnaise | Aioli Recipes:

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Asian Fry Sauce 2.0
Avocado Cilantro IPA Aioli
Beermustardnaise
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Cajun IPA Remoulade Sauce
Hatch Green Chili Mayonnaise
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Horseradish Ale Sauce by Home Brew Chef
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New Mayonnaise | Aioli
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My favorite mayonnaise, as this version packs an extra umami punch.
Servings Prep Time
1 1/2 cup 5 minute
Servings Prep Time
1 1/2 cup 5 minute
New Mayonnaise | Aioli
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
My favorite mayonnaise, as this version packs an extra umami punch.
Servings Prep Time
1 1/2 cup 5 minute
Servings Prep Time
1 1/2 cup 5 minute
Instructions
Food Processor Directions:
  • In the bowl of a food processor, add the eggs, nutritional yeast, freshly ground flaxseed, white miso (or other miso), vinegar, collagen powder, salt, and garlic (raw and roasted). Seal with the lid and pulse several times until all the ingredients are puréed together. The inside of the bowl might need to be scraped down with a rubber spatula, depending on the size of your food processor.
  • Once all the Base Ingredients are incorporated, measure out the two oils into a liquid measuring cup. I use a blend of the two oils to create a more balanced flavor. If you use all olive oil, the resulting mayonnaise will be strong in olive oil flavor and have a harder hue of yellow. Turn the food processor on and slowly add the oil, starting with just a few drops at a time. After a tablespoon, you can add the oil a little faster (a drizzle), but never pouring the oil in. This will slowly incorporate the oil into the egg yolks, making a fluffy/pillowy sauce vs a broken sauce (were the oil looks like rain drips with splotches of egg yolk swimming in it.
    White Miso Malt Vinegar Mayonnaise
  • Taste the mayonnaise; it should be balanced with enough acid to cut part of the richness (as the sauce is rich), with a wonderful pop of umami with a distinctive mayo undertone. Transfer the finished mayo to a 16 ounce Mason jar and seal. Place into the refrigerator and this sauce will last for 1 month (if it lasts that long).
Blender Directions:
  • In the pitcher of a blender, add the eggs, nutritional yeast, freshly ground flaxseed, white miso (or other miso), vinegar, collagen powder, salt, and garlic (raw and roasted). Seal with the lid and pulse several times until all the ingredients are puréed together. The inside of the bowl might need to be scraped down with a rubber spatula, depending on the size of your food processor.
    White Miso Malt Vinegar Mayonnaise
  • Once all the Base Ingredients are incorporated, measure out the two oils into a liquid measuring cup. I use a blend of the two oils to create a more balanced flavor. If you use all olive oil, the resulting mayonnaise will be strong in olive oil flavor and have a harder hue of yellow. Turn the blender on to a low speed and slowly add the oil, starting with just a few drops at a time. After a tablespoon, you can add the oil a little faster (a drizzle), but never pouring the oil in. This will slowly incorporate the oil into the egg yolks, making a fluffy/pillowy sauce vs a broken sauce (were the oil looks like rain drips with splotches of egg yolk swimming in it.
The Old Bowl & Whisk Directions: (AKA Old School):
  • In a medium-sized metal bowl, add the eggs, nutritional yeast, freshly ground flaxseed, white miso (or other miso), vinegar, collagen powder, salt, and minced garlic (raw and roasted). Whisk to create a paste-like consistency.
  • There are a few different approaches to make adding the oil, while whisking the bowl, a critical technique in initializing the emulsification. . The "I wish I had a third hand," thought rolls through your mind... To help stabilize the bowl, take a clean dish towel and unfold it to a large rectangle. Take the opposite corners, one in both hands and flip it over to spin the towel into a rope. tie the two ends together loosely to make a ring. Set it on the work space and place your bowl in the center. This will stabilize the bowl from rocking.
  • Another trick is to whisk only the bottom of the bowl. The more pressure on the side of the bowl will cause the bowl to rock, making it harder to get clean whisks through the mixture, when more oil can pool (if pouring the oil to fast).
  • The last trick is to get another person (family member, friend, room mate, significant other) to hold the bowl.
  • Measure out the two oils and have ready. Whisking the egg mixture, slowly, in a very fine stream, add the oil to the center of the bowl, Keep whisking as fast as you can, watching the egg mixture dissolve the oil into itself. The mixture will start to thicken the last 1/4 cup of oil. Extra large egg yolks can emulsify up to 1/2 cup of oil, per yolk. This is also when the mayonnaise will be the right consistency. The mayonnaise is done when the whisk leaves a trail of where the whisk was, like a thick custard. Using a spatula, transfer the finished mayo to a pint Mason jar (or other seal-able container with a 1 1/2 cup size) and seal with a lid. The mayo will thicken slightly more, once refrigerated.
How to fix a broken emulsion:
  • If the mayonnaise breaks (broken sauce), don't throw it away and start over. Simply pour the contents of the food processor bowl into a measuring pitcher. Add a whole egg to the bowl and turn on the blade. Slowly re-add the ingredients from the pitcher and the emulsification will restart.
Recipe Notes

Try using this recipe in:

Tuna Fish Salad

Deviled Eggs

Salad Dressings

       Use as a dip for roasted vegetables, crudites, and other seasonal vegetatables

 

Sean Paxton

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