Hefeweizen Spätzle

Hefeweizen-Spatzle-300

 

German spätzle is a cross between a dumpling and a stubby noodle.  They can be made with a traditional press or something in your cupboard that has a few holes drilled in it, like a colander.  This recipe uses the flavors of Hefeweizen to enhance the flavor and German heritage of the recipe.

 

Special Equipment:

1        each            Spaetzle Press

 

Serves: 6 as a side dish

 

Adapted from BeerAdvocate Magazine: Cuisine à la Bière | Oct 2008 | Issue #21

 

Other Spätzle | Spaetzle Recipes:

Hefeweizen Spätzle
Votes: 1
Rating: 5
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Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
German spätzle is a cross between a dumpling and a stubby noodle. This version uses Hefeweizen to enhance the flavor.
Servings Prep Time
6 guests 10 minute
Cook Time Passive Time
10 minute 30 minute
Servings Prep Time
6 guests 10 minute
Cook Time Passive Time
10 minute 30 minute
Hefeweizen Spätzle
Votes: 1
Rating: 5
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
German spätzle is a cross between a dumpling and a stubby noodle. This version uses Hefeweizen to enhance the flavor.
Servings Prep Time
6 guests 10 minute
Cook Time Passive Time
10 minute 30 minute
Servings Prep Time
6 guests 10 minute
Cook Time Passive Time
10 minute 30 minute
Ingredients
Hefeweizen Spätzle Batter Ingredients:
To Finish:
Servings: guests
Units:
Instructions
Hefeweizen Spätzle Batter Directions:
  • In a large bowl, beat eggs with a whisk or electric mixer for 3 – 4 minutes, until light, fluffy and pale yellow. Add the German Wheat Ale (including sediment) and butter, and stir to combine. Sift the flour and salt into the same bowl. Mix to combine the ingredients to form a batter for about 3 minutes on a medium speed. This will form gluten, giving the spätzle its texture. This Let this rest for 30 minutes, resting the gluten, as the beer water comes to a boil.
Cooking Directions:
  • In a large pot over high heat, add beer, water and salt. Once the liquid is boiling, turn down the heat to create a simmer. Take the spätzle press and fill it 3/4 full with the batter. Place over the pot and lightly press the handle down to slowly expel the thin noodles into the beer water. Fill the press about 2–3 times per batch. Stir to break the noodles up lightly, and to avoid any clumps from forming; cook for 6 – 7 minutes. Using a spider or other hand strainer, remove the spätzle from the beer water to another large bowl, filled with cold water, to stop the cooking. Cook all the batter. At this point, you can drain the water and let sit for up to 3 hours.
  • When ready to serve, heat a nonstick sauté pan over medium heat, adding 2 tablespoons of butter. Just as the butter stops foaming, add half of the spätzle and toss to coat, seasoning with salt and pepper. Let the noodles sit, not stirring or moving the pan for 4 – 5 minutes, to lightly brown the noodles, adding a light crust to some of them. Add half of the parsley and toss, cooking another 3 – 4 minutes. Transfer to a serving platter, keeping warm as the next batch is preparing. If you have two pans, you can do side-by-side batches to speed up serving.
Recipe Notes

This is a perfect side dish to Hasenfeffer, a German braised rabbit fricassee.

Hasenpfeffer-2-300

Sean Paxton

One Response to “Hefeweizen Spätzle

  • Floyd Anderson
    2 years ago

    Very interesting idea to cook the spaetzle dough in beer. I will have to give this a try.

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